Talk:Energy transformation

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I replaced the initial page on energy conversion. I tried to keep the same topics that were mentioned, while re-organizing the page. There is a large community of engineers that specialize on one form or another of energy conversion and I am not one of them. It would be great if someone with at least a subscription to IEEE Energy Conversion could add to this page.

Conversion, Transformation, All the same?[edit]

I cannot see the difference of conversion or transformation within one form of energy and the "transformation" of one form of energy to another. And: transportation of energy (Transmission (mechanics))? -- Wispanow 16:25, 27 August 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]

I can't see that difference either, on the contrary, this article gives the impression that transform and convert mean the same in this context. If the difference exists, it would be helpful to explain it very clearly.62.65.237.192 (talk) 20:54, 21 June 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]
Perhaps it would be helpful if you could give an example of a conversion/transformation within one form of energy? I think the point of the article is that energy comes in many forms, and we only talk about transformation or conversion if one form is being changed to another. As for example when the kinetic energy of a baseball is changed to heat (thermal energy) and sound (sonic energy) when it hits a glove. SBHarris 06:05, 22 June 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

examples of energy transformation..[edit]

Bold text what is the examples of energy transformation..?? i didn't now that.. plss help me.. ^^..tnx..muah.. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.107.235.167 (talk) 12:09, 28 September 2010 (UTC)Reply[reply]

The definition of energy[edit]

Te article should use the same definition for energy given in that article (or at least propose the same idea with a different wording). I will change it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by George Rodney Maruri Game (talkcontribs) 20:32, 9 December 2010 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Second Law[edit]

"such as when potential energy is converted to kinetic energy as an object falls in vacuum, or when it orbits nearer or farther from another object, in space." Not quite: when the object is dropped, even if it is in a vacuum, there is heat dispersed when it stops falling. See http://www.chem1.com/acad/webtext/thermeq/TE3.html "The second law of thermodynamics says in effect, that the extent to which any natural process can occur is limited by the dilution of thermal energy (increase in entropy) that accompanies it, and once the change has occurred, it can never be un-done without spreading even more energy around." Actually all that occurs implies the delution of thermal energy. There is no "perpetuum mobile". — Preceding unsigned comment added by 186.32.17.47 (talk) 08:20, 30 October 2012 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Gravitational waves (and energy from splitting the atom) missing?[edit]

See: First observation of gravitational waves. And from the second detection: Two solar masses (equiv. to energy?!) of the black holes disappeared, changed to gravitational waves (confirming general relativity; not sure if it requires added time, but "Now theory" says that). And splitting the atom also gives energy, from mass. comp.arch (talk) 14:05, 8 February 2017 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Conversions to thermal energy may occur with essentially 100% efficiency??[edit]

I don't think that's always true -- does anyone know a way to use all of the rest energy of a piece of matter to provide an equivalent amount of heat? Even nuclear reactions can only convert some of it, right? 72.69.89.84 (talk) 17:24, 9 February 2017 (UTC)Reply[reply]